Showing posts tagged Robin.
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dean trippe | moonbase one

Ask me something   I made Something Terrible, created Butterfly, co-founded Project: Rooftop, co-host The Last Cast podcast, ramble on Twitter, and I have a
website.

twitter.com/deantrippe:

    GET PSYCHED.
(In other Batman news, the Batmobile in Arkham Knight will have alternate looks you can choose from.)

    GET PSYCHED.

    (In other Batman news, the Batmobile in Arkham Knight will have alternate looks you can choose from.)

    — 1 month ago with 101 notes
    #batman  #kevin smith  #robin  #green hornet  #kato  #comics  #batman 66  #crossover 

    The greatest influence on my coloring style is @leeloughridge, who used to let me watch him work, over a decade ago. #coloristappreciationday

    One time he was coloring a cover to Spider-Man/Black Cat, and requested my assistance:

    "So, uh, what color is Spider-Man?"

    "Red and blue?"

    "Yeah, but, like, what kind of red? More crimson or orangey?"

    "I don’t know. I mean, it’s pretty red."

    "I’m just messing with you."

    "Oh."

    Back then, we were all coloring by making selections with a mouse! I didn’t work at his studio, but I had a couple of friends doing flats there. When I think of the kind of studio environment I’d like to have someday, Xylonol is still the space I imagine.

    And even though I’ve been on a tablet for ten years now, I still use many of the tools and all of the methodology I picked up from hanging out with Lee those occasional evenings after comics classes, often trying to raise my game by working on Hellblazer pages by Marcelo Frusin without checking to see what Lee had done until I’d finished mine.

    Anti-alias can go to hell. Close your lines. Flat from the back. Subtract selection. Back up the black. Pencil tool forever. One color, one cut, unless you want to get fancy.

    Thanks, dude.

    — 4 months ago with 67 notes
    #coloristappreciationday  #batman  #robin  #robin year one  #javier pulido  #chuck dixon 
    I’ll always love this Win Mortimer cover too much for words.

    I’ll always love this Win Mortimer cover too much for words.

    (Source: rainydayrecesstoo)

    — 5 months ago with 142 notes
    #win mortimer  #batman  #robin  #batplane ii  #silver age 

    Notes on My Son’s Robin Costume

    Field and I ended up basing his Robin costume on Tim Drake’s second Robin look, which coincidentally, was SUPER close to a Robin redesign I’d done in college, which makes sense since the designer (I believe Ed McGuinness) and I both were inspired by Bruce Timm’s second Robin look. McGuinness cleverly added long sleeves, a pouch belt, gauntlet “jags,” and the feathered cape, all of which smartly served to bring Robin’s costume closer to Batman’s than ever before.

    For Field’s costume, I’d initially planned on copying my redesign from You’ll Be Safe Here, but Field favored a black and yellow cape rather than the green one, I’d designed, and the hood seemed a bit difficult for me and my mom to work. I’d also planned on the nod to Damian’s tunic, but I didn’t want to attempt modifying the Under Armor fabric, and it looked fine tucked in.

    For the feet, I found lace-up Converse boots that only needed a little Plasti-Dip black on the white parts to get them up to code, and they served as a nod to Damian’s kicks. I added DC booth give-away Damian “R” symbol buttons to the side for an extra touch of quality. The belt-buckle and mask are from a Teen Titans cartoon show Robin playset I bought nearly ten years ago to get the included Titans communicator (that, infuriatingly, looks amazing, but doesn’t play the right ringtone). The belt is a simple child’s belt spray-painted yellow.

    The “R” symbol is a patch someone bought me a few years ago for my birthday, and I used to wear it on a red cardigan to conventions. That seemed like a good thing to pass on to my boy. The gloves are long costume gloves from Party City, hemmed to the forearm, and the trunks are women’s athletic shorts from Target. I also got him a large wooden dowel and painted it silver to look like Tim’s aluminum bo staff, but we haven’t taken any pictures with it. Yet.

    I wanted to post these notes because I find costuming for Halloween incredibly enjoyable, and I was raised by my mom to make costumes at home by modifying easily assembled off-the-rack pieces, because we both agree they end up looking much higher in quality than most store-bought costumes. And I wanted to talk about it because I wanted to show how easy it is to be on the lookout and put together a damn good costume relatively inexpensively over the course of the month, with a few modifications to the original pieces. Also, I wanted to point out that costumes don’t have to be rigidly tied to one interpretation of the character. I feel like this custom Robin looks INCREDIBLY authentic as the Boy Wonder, but clearly is a collection of curated nods to various versions of the character, like many of the designs I made for You’ll Be Safe Here.

    Anyway, I hope you enjoyed the additional info! :)

    — 5 months ago with 95 notes
    #robin  #costuming  #halloween  #dean trippe  #field trippe  #cosplay  #comics  #ed mcguinness  #bruce timm  #tim drake 

    New batch of #DEANCON2013 sketches, above! I’m opening up more spots, to fix my car again, if you’d like one. Details are the same as before:

    $35 - Single Character, Inked (superheroes and supporting cast only), 5.5” x 8.5”

    $50 - Two Characters, Inked (superheroes and supporting cast only), 5.5” x 8.5”

    + add $5 for shipping within the U.S., $10 for Canada.

    I’m doing superheroes and supporting cast only because I think they turn out alright.

    I have a certain number of slots available on a first come, first served basis, so you can PayPal me (deantrippe@gmail.com), and include the character(s) you want in the notes.

    — 6 months ago with 122 notes
    #deancon2013  #phoenix  #jean grey  #wolverine  #superman  #lois  #robin  #comics  #dean trippe  #sketches 
    wearing red to support marriage equality.
it really shouldn’t matter if someone wants to share their adventures with a boy wonder or a supergirl.

    wearing red to support marriage equality.

    it really shouldn’t matter if someone wants to share their adventures with a boy wonder or a supergirl.

    — 1 year ago with 91 notes
    #robin  #dean trippe  #equality  #prop8  #politics  #comics  #supreme court  #boy wonder  #girl wonder 
    Batmans Beyond

    I read that you don’t like the Justice League Unlimited ep. Epilogue. Maybe you have gone into it before, but why is that? I am a huge fan of the series, and never really had that much of a problem with it. Not defending it, just interested in your thoughts.

    -speedyjvw

    Basically, it undermines the entire Batman Beyond series, the events that brought Bruce and Terry together, their personal choices, and a central tenet of Batmanism, which is that with enough drive and training, anyone can become Batman. Or Batgirl. Or Batwoman. Or Batwhoever. Parts of the Epilogue story are interesting, but they don’t belong in the Batman Beyond canon, in my opinion, and it wasn’t really a satisfying ending for JLU.

    The Batman (and Superman, for that matter) Family is about adoption, not genetic lineage. Alfred raises Bruce, Bruce raises Robin(s), and even when Bruce has a child of his own, he must adopt him, and later it’s the eldest adoptive son, Dick, who mentors Damian. As a boy who was abandoned by a lying, criminal, drug-abusing father (who I swear to God, dressed up as a clown for Halloween), the example of Batman and Robin felt like a mirror my own adoptive father’s relationship with me. (Shout out to Charlton Trippe! Master guitar player, avid hunter and fisherman, lifelong Sasquatch fan, and father of three grown children whom he still makes laugh.) You don’t need to share your child’s DNA to be a dad, and doing so sure as heck doesn’t make you one worthy of the title.

    Anyway, my own daddy issues aside (let’s pretend that’s possible), genetics don’t create heroism. Choices do. Every good hero story tells you that we are who we choose to be. Of course there are genetic factors. My boy, internet codename: Field, is so much like me I’m sometimes not sure his mom got any chromosomes in there. (Just kidding, he’s just like her, too. I’m considering a maternity test anyway.) But he’ll be his own man, and it’s my parenting that has the most impact on his character, not sharing my genes. I’m teaching him to be sweet, silly, strong, smart, and suave. (I call it FiveS. I should write a book for kids on how to be super rad.)

    This parentage-equals-fate sort of thinking always troubles me. I mean, it can work fine in stories, but more often than not, I think it takes away from the hero. It’s just Nazi thinking. Eugenics are gross, guys. It’s fine to think about the qualities you share with your parents, and I certainly feel those I share with mine, but you’re on this planet to make your own impact. Terry McGinnis didn’t deserve to have his life ripped out from under him for the sake of even further Bruce Wayne worship. Making Bruce his genetic father, and going so far as to have Terry refer to him that way, takes away from his real father’s legacy and the tragedy that spurned a boy who lost his dad to become Batman.

    I love Bruce Wayne. And as someone who has spent a lifetime working with younger people because of his example of doing so, I think Epilogue cheapens his relationship with Terry rather than deepens it.

    (BTW, there was a similar story to this a few years ago where someone tried to retcon it so James Gordon was, it turns out, not just Barbara Gordon’s uncle and adoptive father, but actually her genetic father due to maybe infidelity on his and his sister-in-law’s part? How in Bill Finger’s name does that help anything at all?)

    Teach the young people you know to be amazing. Because they can be. Give them the tools and encouragement they need. They can be better than we were. Show them the truth, that the world is broken in so many ways, but dedicated people doing their best to help are making monumental differences over time. Batman is about hope, not fear. Bruce’s younger allies are both the result of that hope, and proof that it will carry on. There is nothing that gives me more hope than the next generation. Superheroes teach us to use all of our abilities to help everyone we can. Especially kids.

    So let’s put them up on our shoulders so they can see the signal.

    — 1 year ago with 80 notes
    #batman  #batman beyond  #dean trippe  #robin  #parenting  #dads  #dadlife  #kids  #rebloggable 
    Dick and Damian, the Boys Wonder.

    Dick and Damian, the Boys Wonder.

    — 1 year ago with 137 notes
    #dean trippe  #comics  #batman  #robin